Amendment to C.I.XII

Amendment to C.I.XII

BE ENACTED BY THE STATE OF FIRESTONE CONGRESS HERE ASSEMBLED THAT:

Section 1: Article One Section XII of the State of Firestone Constitution shall be amended:

Section 1A: Section C.I.XII currently states: “An impeachment is the process where an elected official, and/or a government official of the Executive, Legislative, or Judicial branch may be removed from office should they be impeached and convicted of having committed a crime. Impeachments must be sponsored by a member of the House of Representatives, where all impeachments will initiate. The House of Representatives is to deliberate over what crime(s) have been committed, and what they are to charge the official under impeachment with. The House of Representatives must vote on a final set of charges for crimes committed to place on the official under impeachment, by a supermajority vote, in order to continue with the impeachment process; should they not come to a supermajority agreement, the impeachment shall fail. Should the impeachment pass the House of Representatives by a supermajority, the official in question shall be considered impeached by the House of Representatives, though not yet convicted of the charges pressed, so then the impeachment shall move forward to the Senate for trial. The Senate is to then deliberate over whether or not the official under impeachment is truly guilty of the charges pressed, and on whether or not to convict or acquit the official under impeachment. The Senate cannot vote on each charge separately, and must vote on whether or not to convict the official being impeached on the charges passed by the House of Representatives as a whole. The Senate must vote on the conviction, by a supermajority vote, in order to convict the official under impeachment and remove said official from his/her respective office; should they not come to a supermajority agreement on the conviction, the official under impeachment shall be considered acquitted, and the impeachment shall fail. Should the impeachment pass the Senate by a supermajority, the impeachment process shall end, and the official that was under impeachment shall be considered officially impeached by the House of Representatives and convicted by the Senate of the crime he/she was accused of, and must be removed from his/her respective office in a timely manner. Should the individual being impeached be a member of either chamber of Congress, he/she shall not be permitted to vote on his/her impeachment in the House of Representatives nor on his/her conviction in the Senate.”

Section 2: Section C.I.XII shall now state: “An impeachment is the process where an elected official, and/or a government official of the Executive, Legislative, or Judicial branch may be removed from office should they be impeached and convicted of having committed a crime. Impeachments must be sponsored by a member of the House of Representatives, where all impeachments will initiate. The House of Representatives is to deliberate over what crime(s) have been committed, and what they are to charge the official under impeachment with. The House of Representatives must vote on a final set of charges for crimes committed to place on the official under impeachment, by a supermajority vote, in order to continue with the impeachment process; should they not come to a supermajority agreement, the impeachment shall fail. Should the impeachment pass the House of Representatives by a supermajority, the official in question shall be considered impeached by the House of Representatives, though not yet convicted of the charges pressed, so then the impeachment shall move forward to the Senate for trial. The Senate is to then deliberate over whether or not the official under impeachment is truly guilty of the charges pressed, and on whether or not to convict or acquit the official under impeachment. The Senate cannot vote on each charge separately, and must vote on whether or not to convict the official being impeached on the charges passed by the House of Representatives as a whole. The Senate must vote on the conviction, by a supermajority vote, in order to convict the official under impeachment and remove said official from his/her respective office; should they not come to a supermajority agreement on the conviction, the official under impeachment shall be considered acquitted, and the impeachment shall fail. Should the impeachment pass the Senate by a supermajority, the impeachment process shall end, and the official that was under impeachment shall be considered officially impeached by the House of Representatives and convicted by the Senate of the crime he/she was accused of, and must be removed from his/her respective office in a timely manner. Should the individual being impeached or expelled be a member of either chamber of Congress, he/she shall not be permitted to vote on his/her impeachment in the House of Representatives nor on his/her conviction in the Senate.”

Section 3: This amendment shall go into immediate effect upon being passed by both houses of Congress.

Section 4: All legislation in conflict with this is rendered null and void

Respectfully submitted to the State of Firestone Congress,

Chief Sponsor:

Senator, Sir_Mr

Co-Sponsors:

Senator, MrEmote
Representative, Brotix_RBLX
Representative, CandlanLaw

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